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npr

NPR

Pastoral Medicine Credentials Raise Questions In Texas
http://n.pr/1SHoz2Q
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npr - NPR
You've probably heard of the credentials M.D. and R.N., and maybe N.P. The people using those letters are doctors, registered nurses and nurse practitioners. But what about PSC.D or D.PSc? Those letters refer to someone who practices pastoral medicine — or "Bible-based" health care. The Texas-based Pastoral Medical Association gives out "pastoral provider licenses" in all 50 states and 30 countries. Some providers call themselves doctors of pastoral medicine. But these licenses are not medical degrees and critics worry that patients don't understand what those titles really mean. Follow our profile link for the full story. (Credit: Maria Fabrizio for NPR) #illustration
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captain_el : @sunshineandkaffe smh....
embalten : What about DO or PAC
lhcrnrd : @jma_suy read this!
jma_suy : @lhcrnrd yep, a BS... not a Bachelor of Science
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npr - NPR
Money isn't pixie dust for troubled schools, magically boosting test scores or graduation rates. But it can make a lasting difference for some kids. Whether to spend more is one of the loudest debates in education. Follow our profile link for the full story. (Credit: @thelajohnson | LA Johnson/NPR) #education
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indoor_camping : Please continue covering this story. It's important
kgjordan : @mdoyle01 Nailed it.
sandra.doty : Mdoyle01 nailed it.
lukeoplakia : Story Corp sucks!! Seriously who TF is going to go listen to this crap at the library of congress?!?
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npr - NPR
[4/4] Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives had already seen many of their communities buckle under the same pressures. The shuttering of the village Kangeq left deep scars on the former residents. In the decade after they were moved to an apartment block in the capital city of Nuuk, more than 10 of them had taken their own lives. “Almost all the young men,” says Anda Poulsen, who grew up in the town. Follow the link in our profile to learn more. (Credit: @johnwpoole | John W. Poole/NPR)
miemimiemi1 : Wow, such free spirits
colonjohnson : Quackkk
timeless_lea : So tragic
edellea : @npr guys gotta realize your captions shouldn't be taller than your pictures. It's Instagram.
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npr - NPR
[3/4] Kangeq was one of the oldest settlements in Greenland. At its peak, about 150 people lived there. But by 1974, that number was down to 50 or 60. That’s the year the ruling Danish government closed the town. Today, the only signs of life are left by foxes, sea eagles, crows and other animals. They eat berries and sea creatures, like the remnants of this sun-bleached crab resting on a bed of lichens. Follow the link in our profile to learn more. (Credit: @johnwpoole | John W. Poole/NPR)
old_suthern_soul_farm : intriguing series 🙌🏼
dvntev : @breeacosta
___.valentina._ : Love the story behind the picture✨🔆✨
breeacosta : @dvntev woahhhh, the whole story is mindblowing
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npr - NPR
[2/4] The village of Kangeq, Greenland was famous for its strong Inuit hunters and good location at the mouth of a fjord. It was where the first Scandinavian missionaries had settled, the first Greenlandic artists had painted and some of the last traditional Inuit kayak hunters had braved the ocean. But the Danish government decided in 1974 to remove the village from the list of towns in Greenland. It would be much easier if the Inuit people moved to larger towns where the infrastructure was already in place. This was devastating to the residents of Kangeq. All that’s left now are a few old buildings. Follow the link in our profile to learn more. (Credit: @johnwpoole | John W. Poole/NPR)
gaynachos : @rhythmbox this story made me think of you
rhythmbox : @gaynachos thanks! I wonder if I could drive our van there?
bananekas : @brandokell want to live here?
elizabeth624sf : Unintended consequences again...
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npr - NPR
[1/4] The suicide rate in Greenland is the highest in the world. Reporter Rebecca Hersher, above, spent three months investigating why. And it’s not because of the dark or the cold. The country is trying to leave its colonial past behind and is struggling to save the lives of a new generation of Inuit youth. Follow the link in our profile to see the whole story. (Credit: @johnwpoole | John W. Poole/NPR)
_knit_wit : Yea @siggesel I think @dvillela made an insensitive comment about Greenland and the only way for him to redeem himself is to travel there and go dogsledding with you
dvillela : True @_knit_wit . If anyone at all needs more information about Greenland, my friend @_knit_wit has never been there because he prefers the beach and would rather not deal with the snow issues.
noeminunez57 : Heard this piece last weekend, interesting
tjaerandsen : @louisetjaerandsen !
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npr - NPR
As a celebrated portrait photographer, Platon Antoniou (who goes professionally by his first name) is well known for his close-up depictions of the powerful. He has aimed his camera at the faces of celebrities and world leaders ranging from Vladimir Putin and Muammar Gadhafi to Willie Nelson and Woody Allen. Platon's 2011 book, ‘Power’, featured photos of more than 100 world leaders. In his newest book, ‘Service’, the British-born photographer turns his lens on U.S. military personnel and their loved ones. "I had done so many portraits of leaders," he says. "And what is great leadership? We have seen it being about confidence, charisma, strength, decision making. We all know that side. But there's another side that's far more complicated – that's the idea of service. I wanted to find out what happens when you're asked to do something and you do it – and it's very dangerous, and the sacrifices you make. This is where I learned about the other side of leadership, which is service.” In the waning weeks of the 2008 presidential campaign, the New Yorker published several of Platon's images. One, showing a grieving mother at Arlington Cemetery embracing the headstone of her son — a Muslim-American soldier killed in Iraq — caught the eye of former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who highlighted it as he announced his endorsement of Barack Obama, who he hoped would be a unifying figure as U.S. president. "The picture of the mother is the big question of our time: What is it to be American, to be patriotic, to give good service?" Platon says. "Unfortunately, the reason why the [image of the] mother was so powerful — that terrain is even more heightened now. I'm left with this sadness. Did we learn nothing?" Follow the link in our profile for the full interview. (Credit: @platon | Platon) #military #service
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popejoyc : Terribly sad and beautiful somehow. My heart aches for her. God bless her 😔
npr : Here's the story: http://n.pr/1NtdFeL
brittanyamodeoarnold : @emroxx Ling's side piece.
emroxx : @brittanyamodeoarnold 😂😂😂😂
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npr - NPR
Humberto Araujo and his mother, Zaira Yanez, pose for a portrait outside Echo Mountain Primary School in Arizona. Humberto is a second-grader who was identified as gifted. But if he went to a school across the state, it's possible he would never have been noticed. Follow our profile link for the full story. (Credit: @elissanad | Elissa Nadworny/NPR) #arizona #education
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katieboal : Here, here for gifted education!
hipagency : "if you don't like what's being said, change the conversation." 💬 ⚡
sees_alice : @hectorskeltor
npr : Here's the story: http://n.pr/1ST2AA8
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npr - NPR
Police arrest gang members suspected of involvement in the shootings that killed nine bus drivers in San Salvador last July. Gang violence is commonplace in El Salvador, one of the most violent countries in the world. But the capital city of San Salvador was brought to an almost complete standstill when gang members began murdering bus drivers one by one in July 2015. On this episode of NPR's podcast, Embedded, Kelly McEvers travels to San Salvador to explore the dynamics behind these killings. Our profile link takes you to the full story. (Credit: Encarni Pindado for NPR) #elsalvador #podcast
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saltchalknwax : @klayrr yep that's what everyone was still talking about last time I went. Scary stuff
air_e_ana : @marla_hooch so is that a no to spring break there?
npr : Here's the story: http://n.pr/1ShKZYj
ct_wb : @mlieaa_
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npr - NPR
Sa'a, a pseudonym she uses for her safety, was taken by the Nigerian extremist group Boko Haram when it seized more than 250 schoolgirls in 2014. She escaped in the forest and is now studying in the U.S. — and praying for friends still held captive. Follow our profile link for the full interview. (Credit: @btruetoyou | Brandon Chew/NPR)
npr : Here's the story: http://n.pr/1YDDEAR
msmalus : @ummahzya amazing
lisa_ocallahan : @beyoutiful1197
mimisfrancis : Please repost this with a link that works.
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