kqedscience

KQED Science

Explore Bay Area science, nature and environment stories with KQED Science.
http://www.kqed.org/science
1 16
2 24
0 8
0 7
0 17
2 17
2 20
2 28
0 20
4 18
1 17
1 16
0 8
0 23
0 19
0 19
6 15
2 14
0 14
3 15
4 40
0 9
0 11
6 36
1 15
0 39
0 6
1 31
1 28
0 21
1 17
0 9
0 20
kqedscience - KQED Science
@kqedscience's "mug shot" for #scishirt! #publicmediapuns
scishirt - publicmediapuns -
greentownlosaltos : Love science Friday
teacupinthebay - greentownlosaltos - avidbaker - pchen2000 -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
There's a story in every grain of sand: tales of life and death, fire and water. If you scooped up a handful of sand from every beach, you'd have a history of the world sifting through your fingers. Watch our new episode of Deep Look on YouTube and subscribe to see a new video every two weeks! #science #geology
science - geology -
kettlewallace : @megannihilate
4horangeco : This is AWESOME!
jessicaeatsalot - neuticle - welsh_geologist - luz_light -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
Explore new technologies driving a digital health revolution to hack and track our lives in this new special from QUEST: KQED.org/quest #siliconvalley #health
siliconvalley - health -
camdenlenore - rafael415 - pchen2000 - positive4ever -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
Eclipse time! Foothill College student Seongju Choi watches the solar eclipse from the observatory in Los Altos. The solar eclipse will be visible on the West Coast until 4:30 this afternoon. (Photo: James Tensuan/KQED)
presidiosf - luz_light - pchen2000 - aza_bernice_rei -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
Some pygmy seahorses are orange and live on orange coral, and others are purple and live on purple coral. The question for scientists was, do they search for coral that matches their color, or do they change their color to match the coral? Find out the answer in our new video on KQED.org/science.
dawvee - waterstain - odcikin - neuticle -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
These pomegranates are about an inch smaller than the typical size, but they're packed with antioxidants. Scientists are studying if drought-stressed crops may actually be better for you. Learn more about it at KQED.org/Science. Photo courtesy of Tiziana Centofanti.
sfgardn415 : Interesting quandary. We had a little post recently regarding the drought and this lovely downpour SF seems to be experiencing today, wondering if any greywater solutions have come up in the community. #greywater415
surfob : Pomegranates were mentioned in the book of Exodus and have originated from the area between Egypt and the Himalayas, much of which consists of desert. This may be a contributing factor as to why they thrive in drought conditions.
devriesious - dw_blakey - rafael415 - luz_light -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
Can you find the star of the premiere video for our new Deep Look series? Watch our story on Tuesday, October 21.
kqedscience : Our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/KQEDDeepLook
eyeramona : #nature #seahorse
cfreeburg - dw_blakey - morganmrtn - lesliebandy -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
Dry Creek, which usually lives up to its name this time of year, is one of several in the Napa, Sonoma & Green Valleys that started flowing again after the South Napa Earthquake. (Craig Miller/KQED)
thefoxygarden : Oh wow
astupi : I find this scary.
luz_light - jnagy - thefoxygarden - abbynormul -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
A century ago, miners working in California’s Death Valley reported seeing boulders on the desert floor with long trails behind them — as if the stones had been pushed across the sand. But, despite 60 years of trying, no one ever saw what moved them. Now scientists think they have the answer: melting ice. (Photo: Sarah Kat/Flickr)
jennden74 - ebrpd - investintrees - pchen2000 -
instagram
kqedscience - KQED Science
In 2011, water levels were high near the Enterprise Bridge over Lake Oroville. Now the lake is at 32 percent of capacity. Top photo, July 2011, by Paul Hames/California Department of Water Resources. Bottom photo, August 3014, by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.
kqedscience : Uh, 2014, not 3014. Hopefully we'll be out of this drought by 3014.
rachaelcbme : No doubt we're in a terrible drought but, these water level pictures cannot be taken seriously unless it's known that they were taken on the same exact day in both years.
jamie.lea : This is a lake near my grandparents house, it's been slowly getting lower for the last 5 years. I'm sure more has influenced the drop in water level than the drought.
yoamomosita : @coffeemakesmepoop23
emkayallday - claytonbenson - skalantari - odcikin -
instagram
Iconosquare feedback